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Life Events


Every stage of life has its own financial needs and concerns. The life events on this page can help you target the key financial strategies and issues that are likely to be most important to you in this stage of your life.

Starting Out    Changing Jobs    Getting Married    Starting a Family    Saving for College    Starting a Business    Planning/Saving for Retirement    Managing College Expenses    Long-Term Care Planning    Planning an Estate    Planning for Business Succession    Nearing Retirement/Retirement    Caring for an Aging Parent    Loss of Spouse    Financial Windfall   
 
Tapping the Equity in Your Home

Over time, the value of your home has grown and your mortgage balance has been reduced (or even eliminated). The equity (the property's value minus any liens against it) you now have in your home is a reservoir of funding potential. You may decide to tap into it for various purposes, such as remodeling your home, paying off high-interest loans or credit card debt, buying a car, or sending your child to college.

The pros and cons

Home equity financing (which may be set up as either a loan or a line of credit) is secured by the equity you've built up in your home. This type of financing has several advantages compared to other forms of personal loans:

  • Higher borrowing limits
  • Favorable interest rates
  • Tax-deductible interest--if you itemize your deductions on your federal income tax return, you may be able to deduct the interest on up to $100,000 ($50,000 if married filing separately) of home equity debt.

There can be drawbacks, however:

  • You may have to pay closing costs and other fees
  • If you sell your home, you'll have to repay the outstanding balance
  • Since your home is collateral securing the debt, you run the risk of foreclosure if you can't make your payments
Home equity loans

Often referred to as a second mortgage, a home equity loan generally allows you to borrow a fixed amount of money (typically up to 80 percent of your equity) at a fixed rate of interest. The total amount you borrow is advanced to you when you sign for the loan. You'll repay the loan with equal monthly payments over a fixed term.

Home equity lines of credit

When you arrange a home equity line of credit, your lender establishes a revolving credit limit determined in part by the amount of your equity. You then borrow only what you need (up to the maximum allowed) only when you need it (subject to any time limit on the borrowing period). You can access the funds either by writing a check or using a credit card associated with the account.

The interest rate for a home equity line of credit is generally a variable rate tied to an index. Your monthly payments may vary, depending on your outstanding balance and the prevailing interest rate. You may have the option of making interest-only payments over the course of the repayment period (e.g., 10 years), or minimum payments that cover a portion of the principal plus accrued interest, coupled with a balloon payment of principal at the end of the loan's term.

Choosing between the two

When deciding whether to apply for a home equity loan or a line of credit, it's important to consider how much you'll need and how soon you'll need it.

If you want a fixed amount of money for a specific purpose (e.g., remodeling the kitchen), you may wish to take out a home equity loan that advances you the total amount up front. If instead you'll need an indeterminate amount over a few years (e.g., funds for ongoing college expenses), you may benefit most from a home equity line of credit that you can draw on when needed.

Shop around for the best deal

Whatever choice you make, you'll want to shop around to find the most favorable rates and terms. Here are a few things to consider:

  • In an effort to attract your business, a lender may be willing to absorb or waive some or all of the costs (e.g., application fees and points) of obtaining the financing
  • The frequency of variable interest rate adjustments and any caps on rate increases will affect the overall cost of a home equity line of credit
  • If you're considering a home equity line of credit, find out if you have the option to convert the line to a fixed-rate, fixed-term loan in the future
  • When comparing a home equity line of credit to a home equity loan, don't rely solely on the annual percentage rate (APR) as a measure of cost, because the APR for a home equity loan takes points and financing charges into consideration while the APR for a home equity line of credit does not


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*Non-deposit investment products and services are offered through CUSO Financial Services, L.P. ("CFS"), a registered broker-dealer (Member FINRA/SIPC) and SEC Registered Investment Advisor.  Products offered through CFS: are not NCUA/NCUSIF or otherwise federally insured, are not guarantees or obligations of the credit union, and may involve investment risk including possible loss of principal. Investment Representatives are registered through CFS. The Credit Union has contracted with CFS to make non-deposit investment products and services available to credit union members.

 

Before deciding whether to retain assets in an employer sponsored plan or roll over to an IRA an investor should consider various factors including, but not limited to: investment options, fees and expenses, services, withdrawal penalties, protection from creditors and legal judgments, required minimum distributions and possession of employer stock.


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